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Have you checked out all my blogs?


Dollhouse Minis: http://joannes18dolls.blogspot.com/


18” Dolls: http://joannes18dolls.blogspot.com/


General Crafts: http://joannes-place.blogspot.com/


Cooking: http://inthekitchenwithmummsie.blogspot.com/





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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Making Doll Food Polymer Clay 101 pt 9




This week as we continue our discussion of working with polymer clay to make our doll foods I wanted to go a bit more in-depth on how to color your liquid polymer clay. I am working with the same 2 brands I showed you last week in our introduction to liquid clays.

The two easiest ways to color this product in my opinion is to use either chalk or tube oil paint.

For using chalk just scrape off a bit of the chalk from the stick just like if you were going to use it to color your clay. Then mix it into the liquid clay with something like a toothpick. This will give a slightly cloudy color and you can often see the granules of the chalk. This can be a good or bad thing depending on what you are making. For some applications it is just what you do want.

To use tube oil paint just start with the smallest amount you can and just use the amount it takes to color the product. You don't want too much, a little goes a very long way. The paint gives a richer more solid color and is the baked liquid clay retains more of its translucency.

I do want to take a moment to say I know there are a lot of tutorials out there where acrylic paint is used to color liquid polymer clay. This is something the manufacturers do not recommend. Acrylic paint is water based and it can cause big problems when you bake the clay. I have heard of instances where items exploded when those water vapors expanded in the oven. So please stay away from the acrylic paint. The oil paints I use are the cheapest ones from the craft store so the investment in them was less than $5.

The last thing I covered in this video was how to mix the liquid clay with a dry crumbly clay to revive it. As you saw it is really easy to do. This is also the same way you make frosting (or other spreadable food items) from polymer clay.

Lastly I hope the difference in the surface shine was apparent on the video. There is a world of difference in how these two brands look when baked. That is one of the reasons I keep both brands on hand.





Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Making Doll Food Polymer Clay 101 pt8




This week I decided to just talk a few minutes about liquid polymer clay. I know we will need to get more in depth later but for now I just wanted to give you a quick overview.

I am sorry this is so short but time was an issue this week. Darn real life kept getting in my way of making doll stuff. Don't you hate it when that happens?

Anyway, this week we are talking about the two liquid polymer clays I use the most. The first (and easiest to get my hands on) is Translucent Liquid Scupley. You should be able to be able to get it almost anywhere you can buy polymer clay.

The second one is Liquid Kato clay and for me that is something I have to get when I am on vacation since the only store I have ever found it in was Hobby Lobby (and we don't have those here)

Both of these products are very useful and I if possible I would say try to get both. If you are only going to get one (or just to start) I would probably say start with the Sculpey product.


In future weeks I will go over working with the liquid clays in more detail. 

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Making Doll Food Polymer Clay 101 pt 7




This week we are building on the skill we talked about last week. If you remember last week we talked about easy ways to make sure you were getting consistent results when you rolled out your polymer clay. This week we are taking that a step further and talking about making consistent portions of clay.

When might you need to use this skill might be the first question to come to your mind. The answer is anytime you want to make multiple items that are the same size. Things like batches of cookies, berries, and so many more that I can't list them.


The secret is to roll the clay out to a consistent thickness and use a cutter (any shape) to cut pieces. If your clay is a consistent thickness and you use the same cutter to cut it all the pieces will be the same size. They will have the same amount of clay. If you find that your portions of clay are the wrong size for your project it is easy to adjust. You can either make the clay thinner (or thicker) and/or use a different cutter to cut it.